Beverly and Qaminirjuaq

See resources from the management board for these herds.

  • Beverly herd size (2018): 103,000
  • Qamanirjuaq herd size (2017): 288,000

The two herds are treated together here as they are covered by a single management board.

The Beverly herd is shared by Nunavut, the NWT, and Saskatchewan. The herd’s range overlaps with the Bathurst caribou herd on the west, and Qamanirjuaq and Ahiak caribou herds on the east. The herd calves in both the Western Queen Maud Gulf area and the traditional calving grounds near Beverly Lake in Nunavut. There are differing opinions on what is happening with the Beverly herd. A 2015 academic paper suggests that the herd may have ceased to exist as a separate entity, and may have been absorbed into the Ahiak herd.

The range of the Qamanirjuaq herd overlaps with Beverly and Ahiak herds to the west, and is mostly in Manitoba and Nunavut, with portions in the southeast NWT and northeast Saskatchewan. The herd calves in the vicinity of Qamanirjuaq Lake in Nunavut.

Related news

Seal River Watershed slated to become Indigenous Protected Area

A news release from Environment and Climate Change Canada talking about its $3.2 million investment an Indigenous Protected Area in the Seal River Watershed in Northern Manitoba. This area in a wintering ground for the Beverly and Qamanirjuaq caribou herds. The initiative covers traditional territories of the Cree, Dene and Inuit. 
25 August 2020 | cision

Strategy to help NWT’s beleaguered caribou is released

A news story about a new recovery strategy for barren-ground caribou herds in the NWT.  The strategy was developed by group of governments and regulatory boards, collectively known as the Conference of Management Authorities. The recovery strategy will guide how all NWT herds of barren-ground caribou are managed, with the exception of the Porcupine herd.
10 July 2020 | cabin radio

Agnico Eagle tries to ease caribou protection measures for Nunavut mine

A news story about a gold-mining company's attempt to loosen restrictions on transporting ore on a haul road when caribou are present. The mining company operates in the Kivalliq region of Nunavut, north of the community of Baker Lake. The region is used by the Qamanirjuaq herd, the largest herd found in Nunavut.
8 June 2020 | Nunatsiaq News

Arctic caribou move up migration due to climate change

Story about how the Qamanirjuaq herd has moved up its northward migration dates in Nunavut in response to climate change 
4 May 2020 | St. Albert Today

Where are the wolves? Satellite collaring planned for wolves on caribou winter range

a 2020 news story about collaring wolves associated with the Beverly/Ahiak, Bathurst and Bluenose-east herds.
31 January 2020 | CBC

Nunavut’s biggest caribou herd still faces downward trend, warns report

A 2019 news story on the Beverly and Qamanirjuaq herds that talks about the difficulty of tracking hunting numbers especially due to online sales of caribou meat. It is also critical of increased mineral exploration.
10 January 2019 | Nunatsiaq News

Another Nunavut caribou herd faces decline

A 2016 news story about the Nunavut Government’s concern about Internet-driven sales of caribou meat.
4 March 2016 | Nunatsiaq News

Related resources

study on advancing migration, calving dates for Qamanirjuaq caribou

This academic study says Qamanirjuaq caribou are migrating and calving earlier, matching earlier greening uo of calving grounds. The authors think this may show caribou are more resilient to climate change.
(2020)

RECOVERY STRATEGY FOR BARREN-GROUND CARIBOU In the Northwest Territories

This 70-page recovery strategy for barren-gound caribou in the Northwest Territories lays out plans to help the eight herds covered by the strategy. The strategy was required by the NWT Species at Risk Act after the barren-ground caribou were listed as "threatened" in 2018. The governments and co-management boards that developed the strategy have until April 9, 2021 to agree on the implementation of the recovery strategy. 
Conference of Management Authorities (2020)

Contaminants in Arctic Caribou Synopsis Report 2019-20

A 9 page synopsis report of the Arctic Caribou Contaminant Monitoring Program. The program covers several Arctic herds. It concludes, "Levels of most contaminants measured in caribou kidneys were not of concern toxicologically, although renal [kidney] mercury and cadmium concentrations may cause some concern for human health depending on the quantity of organs consumed. Yukon Health has advised restricting intake of kidney and liver from Yukon caribou, the recommended maximum varying depending on herd (e.g. a maximum of 25 Porcupine cariboukidneys/year). The health advisory confirms that heavy metals are very low in the meat (muscle) from caribouand this remains a healthy food choice. There have been no health advisories issued for caribou in NWT or Nunavut."
Northern contaminants program (2020)

Renal trace elements in barren-ground caribou subpopulations: Temporal trends and differing effects of sex, age and season

An academic paper that looks at the level of some metals in kidneys of some northern caribou. It found that copper levels are decreasing in the caribou kidneys, possibly due to changes in what caribou are eating. The paper concludes, "Declining Cu concentrations in caribou are of concern as low levels could potentially negatively affect reproduction and therefore caribou at a population level."
Science of the Total Environment (2020)

Report to the Hunters of the Qamanirjuaq Caribou May 2020

A brief Northern Contaminants Program report on the Qamanirjuaq caribou herd. The report has not found any significant change in levels of the contaminants monitored in the samples from 2018.
Northern contaminants program (2020)

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Format: pdf

Beverly and QaminirjuaqPeopleContaminants

Łutsël K’é Dene First Nation’s Caribou Stewardship Plan

A 47-page 2020 Caribou stewardship plan from the Łutsël K’é Dene First Nation (NWT). The “Yúnethé Xá Ɂetthën Hádı” plan covers the Bathurst, Beverly, Ahiak, and Qamanirjuaq herds.
Łutsël K’é Dene First Nation (2020)

Report to the Hunters of the Qamanirjuaq Caribou May 2020 - Inuktitut

A brief Northern Contaminants Program report in Inuktitut on the Qamanirjuaq caribou herd. The report has not found any significant change in levels of the contaminants monitored in the samples from 2018.
Northern contaminants program (2020)

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Format: pdf

Beverly and QaminirjuaqPeopleContaminants

Barren-ground Caribou Co-Management in the NWT

A 21-page booklet explaining the different responsibilities and authroities for managing all of the barren-ground caribou herds in the NWT. It includes information on responsibilities for herds that cross borders.
Government of the Northwest Territories (2019)

Synopsis Report 2018/19 Arctic Caribou Contaminant Monitoring Program

This project studies contaminant levels in caribou in the Canadian Arctic to determine if these populations remain healthy (in terms of contaminant loads), whether these important resources remain safe and healthy food choices for northerners and if contaminant levels are changing over time.
(2019)

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Format: pdf

PorcupineBeverly and QaminirjuaqPeopleContaminants

2019 report to the hunters of the Qamanirjuaq herd - Inuktitut

2 page summary report to hunters of the Qamanirjuaq herd in Inuktitut reporting on research into contaminants in the herd.
(2019)

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Format: pdf

Beverly and QaminirjuaqPeopleContaminants

KEEYASK GENERATION PROJECT TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS MONITORING PLAN REPORT - CARIBOU WINTER ABUNDANCE ESTIMATE 2019

this 48 page report is part of a multi-year monitoring plan designed to assess the effects on caribou of construction and operation of the Keeyask hydro project. The project is on the Nelson River in Northeast Manitoba. The project area is used by the qamanirjuaq herd, as well as two herds of Eastern migratory caribou in the Hudson Bay region. The report concludes that it is difficult to tell what influence the project has had on caribou crossing affected water bodies, but that it appears construction access roads had minimal impacts on their movements.
(2019)

Report to the Hunters of the Qamanirjuaq Caribou – Feb 2019

With the help of local hunters, we have been taking kidney, liver and muscle samples of Qamanirjuaq caribou since 2006. We collect these samples to study changes in the levels of contaminants in kidneys and livers of caribou. These contaminants may be carried to the Arctic by wind.
(2019)

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Format: pdf

Beverly and QaminirjuaqBarren-groundPeopleContaminants

About BQCMB

This seven-minute video explains the work of the Beverley and Qamanirjuaq caribou management board. Suitable for older grades, perhaps from grades 6-12.
Beverly and Qamanirjuaq Caribou Management Board (2019)

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Format: video

Beverly and Qaminirjuaq

Tactical departures and strategic arrivals: Divergent effects of climate and weather on caribou spring migrations

A 2019 academic paper that looks at factors affecting caribou migration timing and speed. The paper concludes that  later arrival at calving grounds might indicate that females are in worse condition, and that calving and calf survival rates might be lower.
(2019)

Mercury in Seaweed, Lichens and Mushrooms from the Home Range of the Qamanirjuaq Caribou

Qamanirjuaq caribou have higher mercury concentrations than many other Arctic caribou herds. Usually, caribou get most of their mercury from lichens, but local elders described the Qamanirjuaq caribou eating seaweed from the seashore. Since seaweed is known to accumulate some metals, it was hypothesized that the caribou may be getting additional mercury from this source.
(2018)

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Format: pdf

Beverly and QaminirjuaqContaminants

mercury in seaweed - inuktitut

This two-page plain language summary in Inuktitut talks about mercury in seaweed and other food eaten by caribou in the Qamanirjuaq herd.
(2018)

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Format: pdf

Beverly and QaminirjuaqContaminants

You Can Make a Difference - Caribou For the Future

This 23-minute video from 2017 was produced by the Beverly and Qamanirjuaq Caribou Management Board. It includes several clips featuring Indigenous people who rely on the caribou herds.
Beverly and Qamanirjuaq Caribou Management Board (2017)

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Format: video

Beverly and QaminirjuaqPeople

The Importance of Respectful Harvest

This 12 minute video is part one of the "You can make a difference" video produced by the Beverly and Qamanirjuaq Caribou Management Board.
Beverly and Qamanirjuaq Caribou Management Board (2017)

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Beverly and QaminirjuaqManaging huntingPeopleHunting

Cumulative Effects

This 10-minute video is part three of the "You can make a difference" video produced by the Beverly and Qamanirjuaq Caribou Management Board.
Beverly and Qamanirjuaq Caribou Management Board (2017)

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Format: video

Beverly and QaminirjuaqManaging huntingHunting

Report to the Hunters of the Kivalliq Region Contaminants in Qamanirjuaq Caribou – September 2017

With the help of local hunters, we have been taking kidney, liver and muscle samples of Qamanirjuaq caribou since 2006. We collect these samples to study changes in the amount of contaminants such as mercury and lead in kidneys of caribou. These contaminants may be carried to the Arctic by wind.
(2017)

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Format: pdf

Beverly and QaminirjuaqBarren-groundPeopleContaminants

The Importance of Harvest Reporting

This 8-minute video is part two of the "You can make a difference" video produced by the Beverly and Qamanirjuaq Caribou Management Board  
Beverly and Qamanirjuaq Caribou Management Board (2017)

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Format: video

Beverly and QaminirjuaqManaging huntingHunting

SPECIES STATUS REPORT: Porcupine Caribou and Barren-ground Caribou

A lengthy NWT government Species at Risk assessment of barren-ground caribou and Porcupine caribou. It classifies the Porcupine caribou as “not at risk” in the NWT, and the other herds as “threatened” within the NWT. The assessment contains parallel tables that compare Indigenous and scientific knowledge on aspects of the caribou.
Government of the Northwest Territories (2017)

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Format: pdf

PorcupineBeverly and QaminirjuaqBarren-ground

COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on the Caribou (Rangifer tarandus), Barren-ground population in Canada - 2016

The 2016 assessment report on barren-ground caribou prepared by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Species in Canada (COSEWIC). It is a long, thorough and quite technical overview. It resulted in the Canadian populations of barren-ground caribou being designated “threatened” under the federal government system
Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) (2016)

caribou and community well-being (Gjoa Haven)

A web page with a variety of other resources centred on the link between the people of Gjoa Haven (Nunavut) and caribou. Resources on the page range from academic papers to a hand-drawn ink calendar showing the phases of local Inuit use of caribou.
Straight Up North (2016)

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Format: web

Beverly and QaminirjuaqBarren-groundAhiakBathurstLorillardWager BayPeople

What Happened to the Beverly Caribou Herd after 1994?

A 2015 paper that argues that the Ahiak herd may have absorbed the Beverly herd.
(2015)

Beverly and Qamanirjuaq Caribou Management Plan 2013-2022

A 117-page plan published in 2014, that lays out management for the Beverly and Qamanirjuaq herds. There are also shorter summary versions of this plan available on the management board's website.
Beverly and Qamanirjuaq Caribou Management Board (2013)

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Beverly and QaminirjuaqManaging huntingManaging predatorsRange management

Project Caribou - Beverly and Qamanirjuaq

An educator's guide to wild caribou of North America
Yukon Department of Environment (2000)

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Format: pdf

Beverly and Qaminirjuaq

Cadmium in caribou and muskoxen from the Canadian Yukon and Northwest Territories

Cadmium, zinc, copper and metallothionein concentrations were measured in liver and kidney tissue of caribou and muskoxen collected from various sites in the Canadian Yukon and Northwest Territories. Cadmium concentrations in caribou tissues were substantially higher than in muskoxen for all age classes and were comparable to concentrations reported for caribou from northern Quebec and Norway.
Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) (1994)

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Format: pdf

PorcupineBeverly and QaminirjuaqBarren-groundContaminants

A review of Fire Management on Forested Range of the Beverly and Qamanirjuaq Herd of Caribou

This 1994 report from the Beverly and Qamanirjuaq Caribou Management Board discusses fire management issues on the forested part of the herds’ ranges.
Beverly and Qamanirjuaq Caribou Management Board (1994)

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Format: pdf

Beverly and Qaminirjuaq

Education Resources and Teacher Tools: Caribou for the Future

These undated resources are focused on the Beverly and Qamanirjuaq herds, but a lot of the information would be transferable to other migratory herds. There are three poster/fact sheet/video units covering respectful harvesting, harvest reporting, and cumulative effects (of factors that influence caribou decline). There are also contests and other information for students that live in the caribou range.  
Beverly and Qamanirjuaq Caribou Management Board

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Format: web

Beverly and QaminirjuaqPeople

FACT SHEET: Satellite collaring barren ground caribou

A 2-page fact sheet from the Government of the Northwest Territories explaining the use of radio collars on caribou.
Government of the Northwest Territories

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Format: pdf

Beverly and QaminirjuaqBathurstBluenose WestBluenose East